Chicago Symphony Orchestra: Kirill Karabits and Sunwook Kim

Kirill Karabits acknowledges Sunwook Kim | © Anne Ryan 2019

On this Chicago Symphony Orchestra broadcast, Kirill Karabits leads Mendelssohn’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and Capriccio brillant for Piano and Orchestra, both featuring pianist Sunwook Kim.  The program also includes Prokofiev’s Overture on Hebrew Themes, Lutosławski’s Concerto for Orchestra, and concludes with a 1978 Deutsche Grammophon recording of Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony led by CSO principal guest conductor Carlo Maria Giulini.

Prokofiev Overture on Hebrew Themes, Op. 34b
Mendelssohn Piano Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 25
Mendelssohn Capriccio brillant in B Minor for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 22
Beethoven Adagio cantabile (second movement) from Piano Sonata No. 8 in C Minor, Op. 13 (Pathétique)
Sunwook Kim, piano
Lutosławski Concerto for Orchestra
Kirill Karabits, conductor
Originally recorded at concerts in October 2019

Schubert Symphony No. 8 in B Minor, D. 758 (Unfinished)
Carlo Maria Giulini, conductor
DGG 1978

Listen to the Show Here:

More About the Program

The program opens with Sergei Prokofiev’s Overture on Hebrew Themes a work that comes from the busy year of 1919, when the Russian composer was living in New York City, giving recitals and struggling to complete his opera The Love for Three Oranges for the Chicago Opera. 

That fall, Prokofiev bumped into some classmates from the St. Petersburg Conservatory. They had formed a chamber group called the Zimro Ensemble, comprised of a clarinet, strings and piano, and named for the Hebrew word for “singing.” They were in New York to raise money for a new conservatory in Jerusalem.

The musicians handed Prokofiev a notebook of traditional Jewish themes and asked if he’d write them a piece. He initially declined their request but kept the notebook as a gesture. Then, one evening, Prokofiev sat down at the piano, opened the book and began improvising accompaniments to the melodies. He was so enthralled by music that within two days he’d sketched out the Overture on Hebrew Themes. The Zimro Ensemble introduced it at a New York recital in January 1920.

The program also features Mendelssohn’s First Piano Concerto, a work that stemmed from a trip to Italy in 1830, and which seems to have been inspired by a young woman he met along the way named Delphine von Schauroth. This performance features Sunwook Kim, a 2006 winner of the Leeds Piano Competition.

And not to be missed is Lutoslawski’s Concerto for Orchestra. This remains one of his most popular works, and highlights his strengths as an orchestrator and a champion of Polish identity.

Listen to the full show above. This program will be available until April 19, 2023.

Louis Langrée on Beethoven’s Mega-Concert

Beethoven

Concerts were longer in the time of Beethoven, as were attention spans. But even by those standards, the storied program he organized for Vienna’s Theater an der Wien on Dec. 22, 1808 was over the top. Called the Akademie, it ran from 6:30 to 10:30 pm in two parts and included the premieres of the Fifth and Sixth Symphonies, Fourth Piano Concerto, Choral Fantasia in C minor, and other works by Beethoven.  

Continue reading “Louis Langrée on Beethoven’s Mega-Concert”

Philip Glass Finds Orchestral Converts

Philip Glass (photo: Flickr/letterchen)

The New York Philharmonic recently opened its fall season with the King Lear Overture, its first commissioned score by Philip Glass. Music director Jaap van Zweden was a driving force behind the premiere. “I felt strongly that this was a symphonic composer that needed more attention from our orchestra,” the Dutch conductor told me in an e-mail before the performances.

Continue reading “Philip Glass Finds Orchestral Converts”

Bernard Haitink Retires, Leaving a Massive Mahler Legacy

Bernard Haitink leads the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Photo: Todd Rosenberg)

AMSTERDAM – During a fascinating backstage tour of the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam last month, a knowledgeable and droll tour guide paused before a wall of photos of past music directors. He proceeded to weave a series of colorful stories about the heroic and hapless maestros who have led the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, and the drama that sometimes followed in their wake. But drama seemed in short supply for one: Bernard Haitink.

Continue reading “Bernard Haitink Retires, Leaving a Massive Mahler Legacy”

Florence Price: A New Chapter For An Undervalued Composer

Florence Price

Advocates of American classical music have often complained that there is a whole generation of mid-20th century symphonic composers whose work has been unjustly neglected. It includes figures like Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Walter Piston, Roger Sessions, and William Schuman, to name a few who were active from roughly 1930 to 1960 and who now rarely turn up on orchestra subscription programs.

Such a list could also include the name Florence Price. Continue reading “Florence Price: A New Chapter For An Undervalued Composer”

Leonard Slatkin on His Final Bow at the Detroit Symphony

On May 25, I attended the first of three final programs that Leonard Slatkin had programmed for his 10th and final season as music director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. But Slatkin wasn’t there. The 73-year-old conductor was forced to withdraw from the concerts in order to undergo a heart-bypass operation (he’s reportedly recovering well). Continue reading “Leonard Slatkin on His Final Bow at the Detroit Symphony”

New York Philharmonic Can’t Get Enough of Mahler

Jaap van Zweden conducts the New York Philharmonic (Photo: Chris Lee)

The New York Philharmonic is entering a bold new era for fans of Gustav Mahler and other late-Romantic symphonists, if the opening-night gala concert, led by Jaap van Zweden, was any indication. The Sept. 19 program featured Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, performed days after van Zweden led the same work at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, where he is in his final season as music director.
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Orchestras Hire Youthful Conductors to Stay Relevant. Is that Enough?

Gael García Bernal as Rodrigo in 'Mozart in the Jungle' (Amazon)

What can symphony orchestras learn from “Mozart in the Jungle,” the Amazon series featuring a dashing young conductor from Mexico who replaces the aging music director of an orchestra, in a bid to invigorate the stodgy institution? In this Slate article from Feb. 4, 2016, I look at various factors that contribute to an orchestra’s perceived relevance and value in its community – starting with the conductors who stand on the podium.

“Orchestras across the country have been buffeted by deficits, declining attendance, and labor unrest; and the Philharmonic, while in better health than many, remains a medium-sized fish in a New York cultural pond dominated by Broadway, fashion, and the latest restaurant openings. While a conductor’s first responsibility is to the music, is it possible in 2016 for the face of an arts institution—or one that wants to remain relevant, anyway—to avoid engaging with the social and cultural context in which he makes his art?” Read on.

Photo: Gael García Bernal as Rodrigo in ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ (Amazon)