Streaming Classical Music Concerts: The Menu Grows

At a recent media lunch in New York, Hervé Boissière, the president and founder of the French concert-streaming service Medici.tv, showed off the beta version of his company’s new website. Gone was the homepage dominated by a ginormous video player, which automatically started playing upon arrival (forcing you frantically reach for the pause button and/or volume if you had other plans). Continue reading “Streaming Classical Music Concerts: The Menu Grows”

Dearth of Women Composers Sparks Social Media Campaigns

Music by women composers accounts for just 1.3% of pieces performed by American orchestras during the 2016-17 concert season, according to a recent repertoire survey conducted by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Among living composers performed, women do somewhat better, accounting for 10.3% of all pieces. The survey examined the seasons of 85 orchestras, from small regional ensembles to the majors, and found that, as a whole, that there’s long way to go before gender balance is achieved in concert programming. Continue reading “Dearth of Women Composers Sparks Social Media Campaigns”

Why Spotify and YouTube Are Key to Classical Music’s Future

Attracting more young people is perhaps the most crucial challenge that the classical music field faces, and if one thing is certain, it’s essential to create low-threshold on-ramps in places where teenagers and millennials already frequent. Continue reading “Why Spotify and YouTube Are Key to Classical Music’s Future”

Ars Longa, Channeling Cuban Salsa in the Baroque

At not many concerts of Renaissance and Baroque music do the performers pick out random audience members to dance with in the aisles. Nor do such concerts typically feature a lutenist who wields his instrument like a rock guitar god, or a “horn section” that choreographs its parts with salsa- and mambo-style moves. Continue reading “Ars Longa, Channeling Cuban Salsa in the Baroque”

Met Opera Announces 2017-18, With 3 Notable Omissions

When the Metropolitan Opera announced its current season one year ago, it was notable for the fact that it brought back, in fairly short order, the four most-produced works in the Met’s history: Aida, La Bohème, Carmen and La Traviata. Continue reading “Met Opera Announces 2017-18, With 3 Notable Omissions”

Seattle Symphony Stages Concert to Celebrate Immigrants

The Seattle Symphony staged a kind of protest concert on Wednesday night, featuring composers and performers from the seven Muslim majority countries that Donald Trump has sought to bar from entering the United States. Continue reading “Seattle Symphony Stages Concert to Celebrate Immigrants”

Carnegie Hall Feeling Groovy With ’60s Festival in 2018

If you’re at Carnegie Hall next season, don’t touch the brown acid. The venerable venue this week announced its 2017-18 season, one that includes a two-month festival (January 14-March 24, 2018) dedicated to the 1960s. Continue reading “Carnegie Hall Feeling Groovy With ’60s Festival in 2018”

The Crown Uses Classical Music to Dramatize Monarchy

In the Netflix original series “The Crown,” music plays a significant role in heightening the drama and majesty of the British throne. A glance at the show’s IMDB page reveals this is no shoestring operation: The music staff numbers some 20 editors, producers, engineers and composers, with much of the soundtrack supplied by British film composer Rupert Gregson-Williams. The cinematic title theme, by Hollywood veteran Hans Zimmer, broadly alludes to the ceremonial music of Henry Purcell. Continue reading “The Crown Uses Classical Music to Dramatize Monarchy”

Eight Takeaways from Classical Music in 2016

In a year in which the 2016 presidential campaign impacted all corners of public life in the U.S., classical music often served as a diversion or even a refuge for many listeners. But musicians didn’t live in a vacuum either, as several news stories demonstrated. Continue reading “Eight Takeaways from Classical Music in 2016”